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2Blowhards discussion on the commercialization of movies.

George Lucas on movies at the theatre v. movies at home:

“There is a difference between how you make things for big screen and small screen. When you’re designing for DVD, you tend to end up with more close-ups, and your wide shots aren’t so wide. I don’t subscribe to that stylistic shift, but a lot of kids making movies now grew up on TV and DVDs — not films in theaters — so that’s how they make movies. I prefer to make them for the big screen, and they tend to work out alright.”

James Toback on originality and the cinema

I dont think the power of conglomerate corporate distribution stops movies of originality from being made altogether, but what it does is stop careers of real originality from being noticed and developed.

From an angry poster on the same thread:

I mean, really, isn’t the “art” of marketing coming up with the “Taxi Driver” poster once the movie is done? (Think about pitching that movie today: “Well, he’s a vet, and he’s really angry just in general, and there’s this blond, and then there’s a teenage prostitute, and he’s so sexually wierd that he gets off on thinking about saving the teenage prostitute (who doesn’t really wanna be saved), and so he shaves his head and tries to kill a political candidate, and then blows the pimp away, and at the end he’s a hero. What’s the poster look like?” Whoever came up with the Taxi Driver poster is a genius. And they did it AFTER). Isn’t amazing how the wrong people always end up driving the bus? Poster-makers run the movie biz! Stock analysts essentially run most american companies. Defense contractors run our foreign policy. Sigh. It makes me think of the line from the movie “The Player”, when they are pitching a movie, and they say “It’s like “Pretty Woman” meets “Out of Africa.”

My superficial thoughts. I was recently in the market for buying a HDTV (I later decided to wait a year). Despite my decision to delay, every time I watch a movie on my 15 year old TV, I spend a lot of time wondering how a particular scene would have looked on HDTV.

In my city where real estate is still relatively cheap, big movie chains have built gigantic multiplexes which are much more ornate and well-equipped than any moviegoer needs. The pursuit of high margins makes even a moderately profitable venture seem like stupidity.

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