License Breakdown & Avocados

by Robert Nagle on 9/16/2005

in General,Health & Nutrition

Not exactly up to date, but a breakdown of what CC license people are choosing.

I’m pretty shocked (and delighted) at this, but apparently avocados are pretty good for your health, according to WebMD writer, Michele Bloomquist:

It’s true that avocados are high in fat — one reason they’ve earned the nickname “butter pear.” A medium-sized avocado contains 30 grams of fat, as much as a quarter-pound burger. That’s why diet experts have long urged Americans to go easy on avocados in favor of less fatty fruits and vegetables. But now nutritionists are taking another look. They’re finding that most of the fat in an avocado is monounsaturated — the “good” kind that actually lowers cholesterol levels. Thanks to this new understanding, the U.S. government recently revised its official nutrition guidelines to urge Americans to eat more avocados.

The avocado’s image first took on some polish with a 1996 study by researchers at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico (Archives of Medical Research, Winter 1996) that looked at the health benefits of daily avocado consumption. The 45 volunteers who ate avocados every day for a week experienced an average 17% drop in total blood cholesterol. Their cholesterol ratio also changed in a healthy way: Their levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein, or “bad fat”) and triglycerides, both associated with heart disease, went down. Their HDL (high-density lipoprotein, or “good fat”) levels, which tend to lower the risk of heart disease, climbed.

Researchers have also discovered that avocados are rich in beta-sitosterol, a natural substance shown to significantly lower blood cholesterol levels. In a review article published in the December 1999 issue of the American Journal of Medicine, researchers pointed out that beta-sitosterol was shown to reduce cholesterol in 16 human studies.

Sneaking monounsaturated fats into your own daily diet may allow you to enjoy similar health benefits, says Melanie Polk, a registered dietitian and director of nutrition education at the American Institute for Cancer Research in Washington, D.C. Used creatively, she says, avocados can add variety — and good nutrition — to your diet. Instead of spreading butter or cream cheese on your bread or bagel, use some mashed avocado instead. Replace that mayo you’d usually put on a sandwich with avocado slices. You’ll not only save calories, you’ll be cutting out saturated fat and increasing your daily intake of monounsaturated fat as well.

To be honest, I am amazed at the research on this industry site. Now begins the search for recipes.

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