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Odds and Ends on the Web

Screeniac, which reviews web 2.0 applications using screencasts. Definitely cool!

Zeldman and commenters have fun doing a compare/contrast on Web 1.0/2.0 

Guy Kawasaki on speaking to a group:

Don’t denigrate the competition. If you truly do cut the sales pitch, then this won’t even come up. But just in case, never denigrate the competition because by doing so, you are taking undue advantage of the privilege of giving a speech. You’re not doing the audience a favor. The audience is doing you a favor, so do not stoop so low as to use this opportunity to slander your competition.

Here’s his thoughts about how to evangelize a blog:

1. Think “book” not “diary.” First, a bit of philosophy: my suggestion is that you think of your blog as a “product.” A good analogy is the difference between a diary and a book. When you write a diary, it contains your spontaneous thoughts and feelings. You have no plans for others to read it. By contrast, if you write a book, from day one you should be thinking about spreading the word about it. If you want to evangelize your blog, then think “book” not “diary” and market the heck out of it.

(BTW, I am ashamed to admit that I have followed practically none of these rules with my own blog).

Dumblittleman, an excellent how-to/personal finance blog. See how to deal with cops. (and the accompanying flipside from the policeman’s perspective).

Why behavioral ads might be better than Adsense-generated ads:

For most advertisers doing direct marketing, it makes more sense to serve behaviorally targeted ads in a different context than the behavior, such as serving ads targeting golf enthusiasts on a cooking site, he said. For behaviorally targeted ads shown in a different content category than that of the behavior, overall CTR is 108 percent higher and overall ATR is 19 percent higher than ads shown in the same category. ATR was higher in 5 of the nine segments with more than 10 million impressions.

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