≡ Menu

Too Many Enemies & The Death Pool

From a charming NYT obituary on Gerald Ford by JAMES M. NAUGHTON and ADAM CLYMER:

He invited to the White House individuals who had been excluded as political “enemies” in the lists kept by the Nixon administration. When Mr. Ford heard, as a Republican in Congress, that Mr. Nixon kept such a list, he said to an aide, “Anybody who can’t keep his enemies in his head has too many enemies.”

Apparently Ford went to sleep early on the day of Nixon’s resignation:

Mr. Ford and his wife watched the Nixon statement on the television set in the family room of their home in Alexandria. Then, despite the looming accumulation of pressures, Mr. Ford went to sleep.

That he could do so, with no particular difficulty, on the eve of the nation’s most unusual presidential transition, was illustrative. “My feeling is you might as well get to sleep” whatever the circumstances, Mr. Ford had said. “You’ll feel better the next day. If you’ve got a problem, you are better prepared to deal with it tomorrow. You sure can’t do much about it that night. It’s a blessing, really.”

Update: I guess the New York Times wished it hadn’t turned commenting on. Look at this crackpot remark. (Oops: It looks like the NYT did delete the comment which acccused Ford of having knowledge of the JFK assassination beforehand). This comment seemed apropos:

To all that are critical of Gerald Ford, if you want to remember him in a favorable light, just compare him to the current occupant of the White House. Next to GW Bush, Ford was a giant of a man.

Houston blogger Laurence Simon has a deadpool game
where people pick the names of 15 people they predict will die in the next year. The number of points you receive depends on how many other people predicted the same thing. Here’s the 2006 list. At first, I thought it was tasteless, but eventually after every death, I end up wondering how many people predicted it.

{ 0 comments… add one }

Leave a Comment